Faith in markets

Now that housing and credit market fiasco is clear to all observers it might be a good idea to ask how we got here. Answer: regulators asleep at the wheel. Or, more precisely, blind regulators. Blinded by ideology. It worth re-reading something Paul Krugman had to say on this subject several months:

“[D]uring the bubble years, the mortgage industry lured millions of people into borrowing more than they could afford, and simultaneously duped investors into investing vast sums in risky assets wrongly labeled AAA. Reasonable estimates suggest that more than 10 million American families will end up owing more than their homes are worth, and investors will suffer $400 billion or more in losses.

So where were the regulators as one of the greatest financial disasters since the Great Depression unfolded? They were blinded by ideology.

“Fed shrugged as subprime crisis spread,” was the headline on a New York Times report on the failure of regulators to regulate. This may have been a discreet dig at Mr. Greenspan’s history as a disciple of Ayn Rand, the high priestess of unfettered capitalism known for her novel “Atlas Shrugged.”

In a 1963 essay for Ms. Rand’s newsletter, Mr. Greenspan dismissed as a “collectivist” myth the idea that businessmen, left to their own devices, “would attempt to sell unsafe food and drugs, fraudulent securities, and shoddy buildings.” On the contrary, he declared, “it is in the self-interest of every businessman to have a reputation for honest dealings and a quality product.”

It’s no wonder, then, that he brushed off warnings about deceptive lending practices, including those of Edward M. Gramlich, a member of the Federal Reserve board. In Mr. Greenspan’s world, predatory lending — like attempts to sell consumers poison toys and tainted seafood — just doesn’t happen.

But Mr. Greenspan wasn’t the only top official who put ideology above public protection. Consider the press conference held on June 3, 2003 — just about the time subprime lending was starting to go wild — to announce a new initiative aimed at reducing the regulatory burden on banks. Representatives of four of the five government agencies responsible for financial supervision used tree shears to attack a stack of paper representing bank regulations. The fifth representative, James Gilleran of the Office of Thrift Supervision, wielded a chainsaw.

Also in attendance were representatives of financial industry trade associations, which had been lobbying for deregulation. As far as I can tell from press reports, there were no representatives of consumer interests on the scene.redtape

Two months after that event the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, one of the tree-shears-wielding agencies, moved to exempt national banks from state regulations that protect consumers against predatory lending. If, say, New York State wanted to protect its own residents — well, sorry, that wasn’t allowed.

Of course, now that it has all gone bad, people with ties to the financial industry are rethinking their belief in the perfection of free markets. Mr. Greenspan has come out in favor of, yes, a government bailout. “Cash is available,” he says — meaning taxpayer money — “and we should use that in larger amounts, as is necessary, to solve the problems of the stress of this.”

One quibble. I don’t think there is much evidence that they are “rethinking their belief in the perfection of free markets”. It’s worth remembering that the same people who brought us the current crisis in housing and credit markets, and have the economy headed toward the worst recession in decades, have their eyes on the biggest prize of all. They propose to fix the healthcare “industry” by more of the same: deregulation.

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1 Comment

Filed under economics, junglenomics, radical right, slimy marketing

One response to “Faith in markets

  1. donnafairy

    Altas Shrugged is a mythic story, which should not form the basis of an economic philosophy, although I understand that it is something of a bible for Libertarians. But it is a novel – pure fiction!

    And I agree, people who are devotees of Rand are not going to rethink their beliefs in the free market, until they actually create a crisis that inflicts some measure of pain on themselves.

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